Iceland

 

Iceland is losing an average of 11 billion tons of ice per year. Since the mid 1990's an increased warming has accelerated glacial thinning. Without the weight of the glaciers to keep the earth below them in place, Iceland is rising out of the ocean an inch every year. The sheer increase in the volume of water as the glaciers melt is causing the rock below to become more viscous, which can  contribute to lowering the melting point. As a result there is a greater volume of magma flowing to the reservoir under Iceland, which many scientists believe will increase volcanic activity.

Icelanders speak of glaciers from their childhood have completely melted away. After a 2015 study, many geologists and climatologists believe that in 150-200 years, there will no longer be glaciers in Iceland.

 

 

Iceland is losing an average of 11 billion tons of ice per year. Since the mid 1990's an increased warming has accelerated glacial thinning. Without the weight of the glaciers to keep the earth below them in place, Iceland is rising out of the ocean an inch every year. The sheer increase in the volume of water as the glaciers melt is causing the rock below to become more viscous, which can  contribute to lowering the melting point. As a result there is a greater volume of magma flowing to the reservoir under Iceland, which many scientists believe will increase volcanic activity.

Icelanders speak of glaciers from their childhood have completely melted away. After a 2015 study, many geologists and climatologists believe that in 150-200 years, there will no longer be glaciers in Iceland.

 

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